Quick Lawn

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Quick Lawn

You have probably seen the television and internet ads for Quick Lawn, a product from Gardner’s Choice. My first instinct when seeing something like this is that it is probably too good to be true. TV infomercials are so often scams and should be generally avoided. However, Quick Lawn does appear to germinate more easily than regular grass seed. What they don’t tell you is that after it does germinate, it won’t grow any better than regular grass seed. Another drawback is that it is more expensive than regular grass seed. Also beware that this product most likely has a majority of annual ryegrass. That means that a lot of it will likely die after one year.

Quicklawn can be used for lawn repair such as patching small spots or for larger projects like establishing an entire new lawn. It is not that you can’t get a lawn started with grass seed, but sometimes beginners feel like they need some extra help and guidance. If you are more of a do-it-yourself type, then you may want to consider contacting your County Extension office to find recommended grass seed types for your area and instructions to follow an efficient and effective seed plant.

Gardener’s Choice Quicklawn

$11.99
Just sow it and grow it!
Buy Now 

 

 

 

One person said when they tried this product that exactly 2 weeks after seeding the lawn he had excellent growth in bare spots that he had been trying previously to fill for quite some time. He said even some of the spots grew extra thick. This person lived in Georgia and couldn’t get centipede, Bermuda grass, or Quick grass to grow, but Quick lawn worked very well for him.

In the end, if you don’t mind paying a little more and enjoy the extra convenience and assurance of a pre-made product such as Quick Lawn, you should definitely take the plunge. You might also research other related products such as Patch Perfect. One thing to definitely consider is that there is a way to have a permanent lawn that appears instantly – it is called sod.


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