Take-All Root Rot Disease

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Take-All Root Rot Disease

 

In the past few decades, turfgrass pathologists have determined that roots of turfgrasses are often attacked by ectotrophic fungi. These fungi cause destructive patch diseases. Take-all root rot (TARR) of St. Augustinegrass is a major problem for lawns in states along the Gulf Coast. Visual symptoms of the disease include yellow leaf blades that appear chlorotic. The disease eats at the root eventually causing total root system failure resulting in a dead lawn.

Disease Control

In most cases, proper lawn maintenance will prevent diseases from taking hold, but research was done to come up with a practical solution to rid lawns of this disease. Survey’s indicated that a high percentage of TARR infected lawns also had St. Augustinegrass Decline (SAD). This suggests that it occurs in high stress conditions.

Applications of Heritage® (0.4 oz) resulted in a decline of the disease following spring and fall applications. The application of this peat moss topdressing consistently gave good results in repeated field tests. The recommended application is 3.8 cubic feet of peat moss per 1000 square feet of lawn. The success could be attributed to the raised level of ph when adding peat moss, which discourages the growth of the disease. Additional research will be conducted to determine the best times to apply peat moss products as well as the effects of peat moss on other pathogens and diseases.

Reference:

Peatmoss Topdressing Control of Take-all Root Rot on St. Augustinegrass

Phillip F. Colbaugh, Xikui Wei. and l. A. McAfe
Texas A&M Research Center at Dallas April, 2003

Author Bio

Matt Morrison is a lawn expert, homeowner, and website hobbyist from Texas. He enjoys working on his own lawn and helping others make their lawn the best it can be. You can read more of his articles here.


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4 comments

  1. In most cases, proper lawn maintenance will prevent diseases from taking hold, but research was done to come up with a practical solution to rid lawns of this disease. Survey’s indicated that a high percentage of TARR infected lawns also had St. Augustinegrass Decline. This suggests that it occurs in high stress conditions.

  2. donald melton

    Can you give me a helpful solution to take all root rot in the Duncanville area of texas zip code 75137.

    thanks in advance

  3. My St Aug lawn went through high stress last summer. Lost most of it to TARR I think…this year I am losing the rest…mostly dirt remains…we are really hot and dry in the summer…water restrictions are in place also…any help

    joe
    midland tx

  4. We are in South Florida and were told by a reputable, experienced local company we now have TAAR disease in our St Augustine lawn. We maintain our lawn meticulously and water properly. They said that it is spread by lawn mower blades. Is that true? They offered 2- consecutive treatments that will mitigate the fungus problem. But there still is a chance that the lawn will not grow back fully in areas that were affected. Does that make sense? Please advise. Thank you.

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